No Fire Zone

“Shocking” —The Guardian

“Vitally Important” —Empire

“An absolute must see” —Nepali Times

“A Tour de Force” —Movies That Matter

—Time Out

“Utterly Convincing” —Toronto Globe and Mail

—Faded Glamour

“Haunting, disturbing…unforgettable” - Right Now, Australia

“Beautifully crafted and heart-wrenching” —Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting

—London Film Review

“Devastating” —Hoopla Australia

“Will break your heart” —Toronto Film Scene

“Shocks on every level” —The London Film Review

“Essential viewing” —Time Out UK

“One of the most chilling documentaries I’ve watched” — David Cameron, UK Prime Minister

“The only film that gives me faith in journalism” - M.I.A, musician and artist

“Images sufficiently graphic to give you nightmares – but sometimes it takes a nightmare to wake us up”—Now Magazine

No Fire Zone Launched its Anti Censorship campaign on Saturday 22nd February 2104 and revealed that the Governments of India, Nepal and Malaysia had all attempted to prevent screenings of No Fire Zone. India in particular showed political censorship and a government official was quoted as saying that No Fire Zone was refused certification because "The documentary may also strain friendly relations with Sri Lanka"..

 

The campaign received wide press coverage and these reports can be seen in our ISSU

Film on Sri Lankan war banned in India

Film censorship is a weapon that political authority uses so often. Sometimes to throttle dissent. Sometimes in apprehension of what a movie may provoke.

India’s Central Board of Film Certification has refused to allow the public screening of the documentary, No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka

Film on Sri Lankan war banned in India
Film on Sri Lankan war banned in India

India Bans Film About Sri Lankan War

India’s film censors have refused permission for the general release of a film chronicling the violent closing months of the civil war in Sri Lanka because the documentary may strain friendly relations between the two countries

India Bans Screening Updated Version of Channel 4 Documentary”No Fire Zone”Directed by Callum Macrae.

Controversial Channel4 film director, Callum Macrae, yesterday told Ceylon Today that the ban imposed on his film, preventing it from screening in India, is an act of overt political censorship.The updated version of the original documentary No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka, which has some recent events, including violent demonstrations against Muslim and Christian communities and Isaipriya captured alive, had not been issued with a censor certificate for the release in theatres by the Indian Central Board of Film Certification, last week. Earlier, he released a TV documentary version of the film.

In response, Macrae has decided to make it available online in India, free of charge. The film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka, the other countries where the screening of No Fire Zone has been banned.

India bans ‘No Fire Zone’ film

The controversial documentary ‘No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka; has been refused a censor certificate for release in theaters by the Indian Central Board of Film Certification. In response, Callum Macrae, the documentary’s director has decided to make it available free online in India. The film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka, other countries where the screening of No Fire Zone has been banned, the producers said in a statement.

Sri Lanka war film released online in India after censorship

The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India Sunday, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo.
Callum Macrae, the British director of “No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka,” said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka — the other countries where its general screening has been banned.

Banned Sri lankan war film released online in India after censorship

The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India on Sunday, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo.

Callum Macrae, the British director of " No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka", said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka — the other countries where its general screening has been banned.

The 93-minute film is a collection of footage recorded in Sri Lanka's northeast by doctors, civilians, rebels and soldiers as the government allegedly bombarded areas teeming with refugees trying to flee the fighting.

Sri Lanka war film released online in India

The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo.

Callum Macrae, the British director of No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka, said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka – the other countries where its general screening has been banned.

India bans release of British television film on Sri Lanka's war

India has banned the release of controversial film on Sri Lanka's war "No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka "produced by Britain's Channel 4 Television.

In response to the refusal, the director of the film, Callum Macrae has decided to post the documentary on line for in India and Malaysia from Sunday media reports said.

In a telephone interview with Wall Street Journal Macrae has said that India doesn't want the film to be seen for political expediency.

"India is denying access to evidence of war crimes, and participating in a process to prevent the truth from getting out," he charged.

"It is India's moral duty to allow the truth to come out," said Macrae.

No Fire Zone banned from screening in India

The controversial documentary film No Fire Zone, has been refused a censor certificate for release in theatres by the Indian Central Board of Film Certification.

The producers of the controversial documentary, have accused the Indian authorities of “political censorship” for refusing a censor certificate on the grounds it “may strain friendly relations with Sri Lanka.”

In response, Callum Macrae, the documentary’s director has decided to make it available free online in India.

The ban on the film will add to the controversy over the Indian government’s refusal to grant a visa to the film’s director, Callum Macrae to attend a premiere of the documentary in New Delhi and Mumbai in November last year.

CBFC refuses to certify film on Sri Lankan war

The Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) has refused a censor certificate to the controversial film No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka, a documentary on the last phase of the war between Sri Lankan forces and the LTTE in early 2009.

The documentary that has been in public domain for over three years has been contested by the Sri Lankan government as propaganda to discredit Colombo in the eyes of the international community.

In a statement from London on Saturday, the producers of the film said the documentary’s director Callum Macrae has decided to make it available for “free streaming online” in India. There was no official word from the CBFC and efforts by The Hindu to contact officials for a response did not yield result.

Sri Lanka war film released online in India after censorship

The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India Sunday, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo.

Callum Macrae, the British director of "No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka", said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka - the other countries where its general screening has been banned.

The 93-minute film is a collection of footage recorded in Sri Lanka's northeast by doctors, civilians, rebels and soldiers as the government allegedly bombarded areas teeming with refugees trying to flee the fighting.

‘No Fire Zone’ documentary to air online for free in Malaysia, India

The director of a controversial documentary on the bloody final days of Sri Lanka's civil war has decided to make it available for free online, following a ban on its public screening in India.

Representatives of “No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka” director Callum Macrae said the full documentary will be posted online for free in India and Malaysia from tomorrow, after Indian authorities refused to grant it a censor certificate for release in theatres.

“The producers of the controversial documentary, have accused the Indian authorities of 'political censorship of unpalatable truths' for refusing a censor certificate on the grounds it “may strain friendly relations with Sri Lanka,” read a statement issued by London-based tpr media consultants.

Sri Lanka warns of US threat to South Asia

The Sri Lankan Government on Sunday warned that the USGovernment may pose a threat to the entire South Asian region.

Sri Lanka's National languages and Social Integration Minister Vasudeva Nanayakkara urged South Asian countries not to leave room for the United States to pass a resolution on Sri Lanka at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) in Geneva next month.

The minister warned that Washington may attempt to use the resolution to force a change of government in Sri Lanka. He said that interfering in Sri Lanka's domestic affairs could be the first step by the United States to interfere in the South Asian region.

SL war film released in India after censorship

The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India on Sunday, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo.

 

Callum Macrae, the British director of “No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka”, said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka — the other countries where its general screening has been banned.

 

The 93-minute film is a collection of footage recorded in Sri Lanka’s northeast by doctors, civilians, rebels and soldiers as the government allegedly bombarded areas teeming with refugees trying to flee the fighting.

Sri Lanka war film released online in India after censorship

The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India on Sunday, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo.

Callum Macrae, the British director of " No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka", said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka — the other countries where its general screening has been banned.

Sri Lanka war film released online in India after censorship

The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India today, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo.

Callum Macrae, the British director of "No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka", said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka - the other countries where its general screening has been banned.

India bans 'No fire zone'

India’s film censors have refused permission for the general release of a film chronicling the violent closing months of the civil war in Sri Lanka because the documentary may strain friendly relations between the two countries.

The Central Board of Film Certification also said in a letter to the director of “No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka,” reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, that it would not grant a certificate to allow the documentary to be shown in theaters because “most of the visuals are of a disturbing nature and not fit for public exhibition.”

In response, the documentary’s director Callum Macrae has decided to make the film available free online on the film’s website starting Sunday

Film on Sri Lankan war banned in India

Film censorship is a weapon that political authority uses so often. Sometimes to throttle dissent. Sometimes in apprehension of what a movie may provoke.

India’s Central Board of Film Certification has refused to allow the public screening of the documentary, No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka – which looks at the last phase in early 2009 of the ethnic war between the island nation’s army and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, seeking a separate homeland for the minority community. (Sinhalas form the majority in the country.)

Film censorship is a weapon that political authority uses so often. Sometimes to throttle dissent. Sometimes in apprehension of what a movie may provoke.

India’s Central Board of Film Certification has refused to allow the public screening of the documentary, No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka – which looks at the last phase in early 2009 of the ethnic war between the island nation’s army and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, seeking a separate homeland for the minority community. (Sinhalas form the majority in the country.)

- See more at: http://www.hindustantimes.com/entertainment/worldcinema/film-on-sri-lankan-war-banned-in-india/article1-1187291.aspx#sthash.C4O4c0Um.dpuf

CBFC refuses to certify film on Sri Lankan war

The Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) has refused to certify a controversial documentary film on Sri Lanka's civil war, saying it could affect India's foreign relations.

The documentary, 'No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka', directed by Callum Macrae, is based on the last stages of war between LTTE and Sri Lankan forces.

Sri Lankan war film released online in India after censorship

The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India on Sunday, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo.

Callum Macrae, the British director of “No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka”, said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka — the other countries where its general screening has been banned.

Film on Sri Lankan war screened

As part of their effort to mobilise public opinion in favour of the US resolution against Sri Lanka and for urging India to move a resolution seeking an independent inquiry into the war crimes in the last moments of civil war, Youths and Students Federation screened Callum Macrae’s film, No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka, followed by an interaction over Skype with him.

‘No Fire Zone’ Documentary To Air Online For Free In Malaysia, India

The director of a controversial documentary on the bloody final days of Sri Lanka's civil war has decided to make it available for free online, following a ban on its public screening in India.

Representatives of “No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka” director Callum Macrae said the full documentary will be posted online for free in India and Malaysia from tomorrow, after Indian authorities refused to grant it a censor certificate for release in theatres.

“The producers of the controversial documentary, have accused the Indian authorities of 'political censorship of unpalatable truths' for refusing a censor certificate on the grounds it “may strain friendly relations with Sri Lanka,” read a statement issued by London-based tpr media consultants.

Sri Lanka war film released online in India

The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India Sunday, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo. Callum Macrae, the British director of “No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka”, said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka — the other countries where its general screening has been banned. The 93-minute film is a collection of footage recorded in Sri Lanka’s northeast by doctors, civilians, rebels and soldiers as the government allegedly bombarded areas teeming with refugees trying to flee the fighting.

Sri Lanka war film released online in India after censorship


The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India Sunday, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo.
Callum Macrae, the British director of “No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka”, said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka — the other countries where its general screening has been banned. The 93-minute film is a collection of footage recorded in Sri Lanka’s northeast by doctors, civilians, rebels and soldiers as the government allegedly bombarded areas teeming with refugees trying to flee the fighting. The documentary has been contested by the Sri Lankan government as propaganda to discredit Colombo in the eyes of the international community.

India Bans ‘No Fire Zone’ Film

The controversial documentary ‘No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka’ has been refused a censor certificate for release in theaters by the Indian Central Board of Film Certification. In response, Callum Macrae, the documentary’s director has decided to make it available free online in India.

The film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka, other countries where the screening of No Fire Zone has been banned, the producers said in a statement.

The producers of the controversial documentary have accused the Indian authorities of “political censorship of unpalatable truths” for refusing a censor certificate on the grounds it “may strain friendly relations with Sri Lanka.”

Claiming that “most of the visuals are of a disturbing nature,” the Board turned down the censor certificate for the documentary.

Banned ‘No fire Zone’ documentary released online

The director of the controversial film  ”No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka “produced by Britain’s Channel 4 Television has released the documentary on line after India banned its release in theaters. Indian media reported.

India’s Central Board of Film Certification refused to grant a censor certificate for the documentary to be released in India claiming that the film cannot be allowed to show in theaters because most of the visuals are of a “disturbing nature and not fit for public exhibition”, NDTV reported.

In response to the refusal, the director of the film, Callum Macrae  decided to post the documentary on line for in India as well as in Malaysia and Nepal which have also banned the public screening of the film.

Macrae said the film will also be available free in Sri Lanka.

Sri Lanka warns of US “threat”

The Sri Lankan Government today warned that the United States Government can pose a threat to the entire South Asian region.

National languages and Social Integration Minister Vasudeva Nanayakkara urged South Asian countries not to leave room for the U.S. to pass a resolution on Sri Lanka at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) next month.

The Minister warned that the U.S. may attempt to use the resolution to force a change of Government in Sri Lanka.

He said that interfering in Sri Lanka’s domestic affairs could be the first step by the United States to interfere in the South Asian region.

Amnesty urges India to revoke ban on Sri Lankan war documentary

Amnesty International India on Monday urged the Central Board of Film Certification and the Government to ``swiftly remove the ban’’ on the film `No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka’ – a documentary on the last phase of the war between the Sri Lankan forces and the LTTE in early 2009.

Questioning the CBFC decision, Amnesty in a statement said the refusal of certification for the theatre release of the film was an attack on the freedom of speech and information in India. ``It also hurts the movement within India to push for an independent and international investigation into alleged war crimes in Sri Lanka’s 2009 war.’’

India bans film on Sri Lanka

There is a ban culture pervading in India. Books and motion pictures are the biggest casualties of this.

Movie ban is a weapon that political authority uses so often. Sometimes to throttle dissent. Sometimes in apprehension of what a movie may provoke.

India’s Central Board of Film Certification has refused to allow the public screening of the documentary, No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka – which looks at the last phase in early 2009 of the ethnic war between the island nation’s army and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, seeking a separate homeland for the minority community. (Sinhalas form the majority in the country.)

Although the movie has been in the public domain for more than three years, Colombo has been lambasting it, calling the documentary propaganda to shame the Sri Lankan administration.

After India’s Censor Board refused to certify the film, the director of the documentary, Callum Macrae, said his work would now be freely available on the net in India. It will be in English with Hindi subtitles.

Sri Lanka war film released online in India after censor ban

The director of a controversial war film on Sri Lanka streamed it free online in India on Sunday, after censors banned its theatrical release over fears it may strain friendly ties with Colombo.

Callum Macrae, the British director of “No Fire Zone: The killing fields of Sri Lanka”, said the film will also be available free in Malaysia, Nepal and Sri Lanka — the other countries where its general screening has been banned.

The 93-minute film is a collection of footage recorded in Sri Lanka's northeast by doctors, civilians, rebels and soldiers as the government allegedly bombarded areas teeming with refugees trying to flee the fighting.

The documentary has been contested by the Sri Lankan government as propaganda to discredit Colombo in the eyes of the international community.

‘No Fire Zone’ documentary banned in India

The documentary ‘No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka’ has been banned from theatrical release in India, after it was refused a censorship certificate on grounds that it may strain relations with Sri Lanka.

Indian authorities refused to certify the film stating that it “may strain friendly relations with Sri Lanka”.

The decision was slammed by the producers of the award winning documentary, who labelled it “political censorship of unpalatable truths”.

In response, they have released the film for free online in India, with Hindi subtitles. It can viewed from Sunday the 23rd of February 2014 at http://nofirezone.org/watch.

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